Deborah Brown

Deborah Brown

Drawing on the history of portraiture in Western Art, Deborah Brown explores the way that composition influences narrative. Different viewpoints are employed to place the viewer in a variety of roles: friend, observer, intruder, story teller. The environment created by the paintings is both specific and universal, reminding us that each of us is alone in our inner and external worlds.

Born in California in 1955, Deborah Brown lives and works in New York City. Select exhibitions include: Hall Art Foundation, Schloss Derneburg Museum Derneburg, Germany (2021-2020); MISA, Art Cologne, Germany (2021); Bundy Modern, Waitesfield, Vermont (2019); Union Hall, Denver, CO (2019); Institute of Contemporary Art, Maine College of Art, Portland (2017). Selected collections: Indianapolis Museum of Art; DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Park, Lincoln, MA; Frederick R. Weisman Museum of Art, Malibu, CA; Art Museum of South Texas, Corpus Christi; Bass Museum of Art, Miami; Arkansas Arts Center, Little Rock; Mobile Museum of Art, AL; Orlando Museum of Art, FL; The Art Museum at Florida International University, Miami; The Columbia Museum of Art, South Carolina.

Deborah Brown

Deborah Brown

Drawing on the history of portraiture in Western Art, Deborah Brown explores the way that composition influences narrative. Different viewpoints are employed to place the viewer in a variety of roles: friend, observer, intruder, story teller. The environment created by the paintings is both specific and universal, reminding us that each of us is alone in our inner and external worlds.

Born in California in 1955, Deborah Brown lives and works in New York City. Select exhibitions include: Hall Art Foundation, Schloss Derneburg Museum Derneburg, Germany (2021-2020); MISA, Art Cologne, Germany (2021); Bundy Modern, Waitesfield, Vermont (2019); Union Hall, Denver, CO (2019); Institute of Contemporary Art, Maine College of Art, Portland (2017). Selected collections: Indianapolis Museum of Art; DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Park, Lincoln, MA; Frederick R. Weisman Museum of Art, Malibu, CA; Art Museum of South Texas, Corpus Christi; Bass Museum of Art, Miami; Arkansas Arts Center, Little Rock; Mobile Museum of Art, AL; Orlando Museum of Art, FL; The Art Museum at Florida International University, Miami; The Columbia Museum of Art, South Carolina.

Allison Gildersleeve

Allison Gildersleeve

Allison Gildersleeve’s work is a commitment to painting as both a representational tool and a coded language of mark and gesture. Using the genre of landscape as a structural framework, Gildersleeve twists space and color to upend the notion of nature as a quiet escape.

Gildersleeve produces painterly renderings of dense forests and other natural scenes found on the edge of cultivated or domesticated spaces. Thick layers of colorful paint squeezed directly from a tube and moved around with a palette knife intentionally evoke the styles and methods of Abstract Expressionism. Considering her work “experiential landscapes,” Gildersleeve aims for viewers to recognize the subject, only to have it dissolve before their eyes into a vocabulary of abstract shapes and lines, and then reappear. Her affinity for nature stems from time spent in the woods near her New England home as a child, photographs of which form the basis for her compositions. “When I paint these woods, I want it to feel as if all the stories that took place there are unfolding simultaneously,” she says.

Gildersleeve received her MFA from Bard College in 2004, and her BA from College of William and Mary in 1992. Gildersleeve has exhibited widely across the United States and abroad. Notable solo exhibitions include Olle Nymans Ateljeer (Stockholm, SE), Asya Geisberg Gallery (New York, NY), Auxiliary Projects (Brooklyn, NY), Robischon Gallery (Denver, CO), Cynthia Reeves (Walpole NH), Valley House Gallery (Dallas, TX), The George Gallery (Charleston, SC) and Galleri Andersson/Sandstrom (Stockholm, SE). Selected group exhibitions include Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art (NY), CRG Gallery (New York, NY), PS122 (New York, NY), Sharon Arts Center (Peterborough, NH), Dunkers Kulturhus (Helsingberg, SE) and Gana Art Space (Seoul, Korea). Gildersleeve was a 2018-2019 recipient of The Sharpe-Walentas Studio Program in Brooklyn, NY. She has been awarded a NYFA Fellowship as well as residencies at Yaddo, the Millay Colony, the Vermont Studio Center and most recently, the Liquitex International Research Residency in London. Gildersleeve lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

Sara Jimenez

Sara Jimenez

Sara Jimenez is a Filipina-Canadian interdisciplinary artist based in Brooklyn. Jimenez received her BA from the University of Toronto (2008) and her MFA from Parsons the New School for Design (2013). Residencies include Brooklyn Art Space (2014), Wave Hill’s Winter Workspace (2015), a full artist fellowship to The Vermont Studio Center (2016), the Bronx Museum’s AIM program (2016), Yaddo (2018), BRICworkspace (2018), Art Omi (2019), Project for Empty Space Feminist Incubator Project (2019), and the LMCC Workspace Residency (2019).

Jimenez has exhibited at the Pinto Art Museum (Philippines), El Museo del Barrio, Rush Arts Gallery, BRIC Gallery, BronxArtSpace, FiveMyles Gallery, the Brooklyn Museum, Smack Mellon, and Wayfarers Gallery, among others. She has performed numerous venues including The Noguchi Museum, Jack, The Glasshouse, and Dixon Place. Currently, she teaches at Parsons the New School for Design and BMCC, and is an Art Practice Mentor at SVA. In 2018 and 2019 she was listed as one of Smack Mellon's Hot Picks.

Sara Jimenez explores the material embodiment of deep transcultural memories. As a Filipina-Canadian artist, she is interested in materializing existing global narratives around concepts of origins and home, loss and absence. She works in drawing, sculpture, installation, and performance, to create visual metaphors that allude to mythical environments and forgotten artifacts. Jimenez is a collector and alchemist. Among other things, she collects familial narratives, abandoned objects, debris, compost, colonial texts and photos from the Philippines, maps, and textiles. Through material experimentation, she combines and rearranges elements from her collections to complicate pre-existing narratives of place, lineage, and temporality.

Sara Jimenez

Sara Jimenez

Sara Jimenez is a Filipina-Canadian interdisciplinary artist based in Brooklyn. Jimenez received her BA from the University of Toronto (2008) and her MFA from Parsons the New School for Design (2013). Residencies include Brooklyn Art Space (2014), Wave Hill’s Winter Workspace (2015), a full artist fellowship to The Vermont Studio Center (2016), the Bronx Museum’s AIM program (2016), Yaddo (2018), BRICworkspace (2018), Art Omi (2019), Project for Empty Space Feminist Incubator Project (2019), and the LMCC Workspace Residency (2019).

Jimenez has exhibited at the Pinto Art Museum (Philippines), El Museo del Barrio, Rush Arts Gallery, BRIC Gallery, BronxArtSpace, FiveMyles Gallery, the Brooklyn Museum, Smack Mellon, and Wayfarers Gallery, among others. She has performed numerous venues including The Noguchi Museum, Jack, The Glasshouse, and Dixon Place. Currently, she teaches at Parsons the New School for Design and BMCC, and is an Art Practice Mentor at SVA. In 2018 and 2019 she was listed as one of Smack Mellon's Hot Picks.

Sara Jimenez explores the material embodiment of deep transcultural memories. As a Filipina-Canadian artist, she is interested in materializing existing global narratives around concepts of origins and home, loss and absence. She works in drawing, sculpture, installation, and performance, to create visual metaphors that allude to mythical environments and forgotten artifacts. Jimenez is a collector and alchemist. Among other things, she collects familial narratives, abandoned objects, debris, compost, colonial texts and photos from the Philippines, maps, and textiles. Through material experimentation, she combines and rearranges elements from her collections to complicate pre-existing narratives of place, lineage, and temporality.

Sara Jimenez

Sara Jimenez

Sara Jimenez is a Filipina-Canadian interdisciplinary artist based in Brooklyn. Jimenez received her BA from the University of Toronto (2008) and her MFA from Parsons the New School for Design (2013). Residencies include Brooklyn Art Space (2014), Wave Hill’s Winter Workspace (2015), a full artist fellowship to The Vermont Studio Center (2016), the Bronx Museum’s AIM program (2016), Yaddo (2018), BRICworkspace (2018), Art Omi (2019), Project for Empty Space Feminist Incubator Project (2019), and the LMCC Workspace Residency (2019).

Jimenez has exhibited at the Pinto Art Museum (Philippines), El Museo del Barrio, Rush Arts Gallery, BRIC Gallery, BronxArtSpace, FiveMyles Gallery, the Brooklyn Museum, Smack Mellon, and Wayfarers Gallery, among others. She has performed numerous venues including The Noguchi Museum, Jack, The Glasshouse, and Dixon Place. Currently, she teaches at Parsons the New School for Design and BMCC, and is an Art Practice Mentor at SVA. In 2018 and 2019 she was listed as one of Smack Mellon's Hot Picks.

Sara Jimenez explores the material embodiment of deep transcultural memories. As a Filipina-Canadian artist, she is interested in materializing existing global narratives around concepts of origins and home, loss and absence. She works in drawing, sculpture, installation, and performance, to create visual metaphors that allude to mythical environments and forgotten artifacts. Jimenez is a collector and alchemist. Among other things, she collects familial narratives, abandoned objects, debris, compost, colonial texts and photos from the Philippines, maps, and textiles. Through material experimentation, she combines and rearranges elements from her collections to complicate pre-existing narratives of place, lineage, and temporality.

Brad Kahlhamer

Brad Kahlhamer

Brad Kahlhamer is an artist who lives and works in New York City. He was born in Tucson, Arizona in 1956 and received a BFA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Brad Kahlhamer fuses an exuberant embrace of expressionist painting with the visionary tradition of Native American art. Drawing from country western and the Native American rock music scene, the artist’s visionary landscapes swirl with an atavistic energy; the paintings seem to have a sound that accompanies their visual rhythm. The great American bald eagle sweeps though the paintings almost as a surrogate for the artist, representing his immersion into his personal American landscape. Kahlhamer has created his own world in these paintings mixing representations of the real into a visionary “third place,” as the artist describes it.

His work has been collected by institutions such as: the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Denver Art Museum, the Milwaukee Art Museum, and the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art. Brad Kahlhamer works in a range of media from painting and sculpture to performance art and music. Abstract Expressionism and Native American Art both have influenced Brad Kahlhamer's work. The artist has also contributed album artwork for musical groups such as The Kills, and Man Man. Brad Kahlhamer's combines his experience in the music and art worlds and also has created videos that utilize his visual and audio work. Kahlhamer is represented by Jack Shainman Gallery. 

Sean Mellyn

Sean Mellyn

Sean Mellyn was born 1965 in Providence, Rhode Island. He received his BFA from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York. Sean Mellyn’s work has been shown in numerous U.S. and international exhibitions and is included in the permanent collections of the Brooklyn Museum, Museum of Modern Art the Whitney Museum of American Art, Houston Museum of Fine Arts and the San Fransisco Museum of Modern Art among others. His most recent solo exhibition took place in 2013 at Underline Gallery. He teaches painting at the School of Visual Arts, lives and works in New York City.

In his mixed-media sculptures, paintings, prints, and drawings, Sean Mellyn sends up Americana, drawing largely from 1950s advertising imagery to present a twisted vision of American ideals. He is particularly interested in the saccharine vision of the American national character reflected in kitschy objects and advertisements, which he both mimics and mocks. Through deliberate oversimplification, airbrushed surfaces, and a Technicolor palette, Mellyn produces works that look like relics from the 1950s. Apple-cheeked children, cartoon characters, ham hocks, and decorative plates are among the subjects he disturbingly alters. In Nose Jobs (1998), for example, he paints two smiling, raven-haired girls against a crimson background—perfect in every way except for their heavily, absurdly bandaged post-op noses.

Sean Mellyn

Sean Mellyn

Sean Mellyn was born 1965 in Providence, Rhode Island. He received his BFA from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York. Sean Mellyn’s work has been shown in numerous U.S. and international exhibitions and is included in the permanent collections of the Brooklyn Museum, Museum of Modern Art the Whitney Museum of American Art, Houston Museum of Fine Arts and the San Fransisco Museum of Modern Art among others. His most recent solo exhibition took place in 2013 at Underline Gallery. He teaches painting at the School of Visual Arts, lives and works in New York City.

In his mixed-media sculptures, paintings, prints, and drawings, Sean Mellyn sends up Americana, drawing largely from 1950s advertising imagery to present a twisted vision of American ideals. He is particularly interested in the saccharine vision of the American national character reflected in kitschy objects and advertisements, which he both mimics and mocks. Through deliberate oversimplification, airbrushed surfaces, and a Technicolor palette, Mellyn produces works that look like relics from the 1950s. Apple-cheeked children, cartoon characters, ham hocks, and decorative plates are among the subjects he disturbingly alters. In Nose Jobs (1998), for example, he paints two smiling, raven-haired girls against a crimson background—perfect in every way except for their heavily, absurdly bandaged post-op noses.

Sean Mellyn

Sean Mellyn

Sean Mellyn was born 1965 in Providence, Rhode Island. He received his BFA from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York. Sean Mellyn’s work has been shown in numerous U.S. and international exhibitions and is included in the permanent collections of the Brooklyn Museum, Museum of Modern Art the Whitney Museum of American Art, Houston Museum of Fine Arts and the San Fransisco Museum of Modern Art among others. His most recent solo exhibition took place in 2013 at Underline Gallery. He teaches painting at the School of Visual Arts, lives and works in New York City.

In his mixed-media sculptures, paintings, prints, and drawings, Sean Mellyn sends up Americana, drawing largely from 1950s advertising imagery to present a twisted vision of American ideals. He is particularly interested in the saccharine vision of the American national character reflected in kitschy objects and advertisements, which he both mimics and mocks. Through deliberate oversimplification, airbrushed surfaces, and a Technicolor palette, Mellyn produces works that look like relics from the 1950s. Apple-cheeked children, cartoon characters, ham hocks, and decorative plates are among the subjects he disturbingly alters. In Nose Jobs (1998), for example, he paints two smiling, raven-haired girls against a crimson background—perfect in every way except for their heavily, absurdly bandaged post-op noses.

Sean Mellyn

Sean Mellyn

Sean Mellyn was born 1965 in Providence, Rhode Island. He received his BFA from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York. Sean Mellyn’s work has been shown in numerous U.S. and international exhibitions and is included in the permanent collections of the Brooklyn Museum, Museum of Modern Art the Whitney Museum of American Art, Houston Museum of Fine Arts and the San Fransisco Museum of Modern Art among others. His most recent solo exhibition took place in 2013 at Underline Gallery. He teaches painting at the School of Visual Arts, lives and works in New York City.

In his mixed-media sculptures, paintings, prints, and drawings, Sean Mellyn sends up Americana, drawing largely from 1950s advertising imagery to present a twisted vision of American ideals. He is particularly interested in the saccharine vision of the American national character reflected in kitschy objects and advertisements, which he both mimics and mocks. Through deliberate oversimplification, airbrushed surfaces, and a Technicolor palette, Mellyn produces works that look like relics from the 1950s. Apple-cheeked children, cartoon characters, ham hocks, and decorative plates are among the subjects he disturbingly alters. In Nose Jobs (1998), for example, he paints two smiling, raven-haired girls against a crimson background—perfect in every way except for their heavily, absurdly bandaged post-op noses.

Jill Moser

Jill Moser

Jill Moser is an artist whose work explores the intersections of painting, writing, and the animated image. Her paintings, drawings, prints, and artist's books have been exhibited in galleries and museums throughout the United States and Europe, and featured in prominent collections, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Museum of Fine Arts Houston, The National Gallery of Art, The Yale University Art Gallery, The Fogg Art Museum, and The National Library of France. Over the past two decades, Moser has made numerous print editions with Jungle Press, Burnet Editions, Wingate Studios, Landfall Press, Brand X, Collaborative Art Editions, and Manneken Press. She has worked collaboratively on projects with poets, artists, designers, and architects. She has taught at Princeton University, Virginia Commonwealth University, SUNY, and The School of Visual Arts and lectured across the United States. She lives and works in New York.

These new editions relate directly to an extraordinary series of collages that the artist undertook in 2020. According to Moser, woodcut as a process has a strong affinity to collage. In her extensive career as a printmaker, these images are the first that employ woodcutting exclusively.

Shahzia Sikander

Shahzia Sikander

Shahzia Sikander was born in 1969 in Lahore, Pakistan. She is a Pakistani-American artist who works in drawing, painting, animation, large-scale installation, performance and video. Sikander was traditionally taught the discipline of Indo-Persian miniature painting, where she studied at The National College of Lahore in Pakistan. Sikander received her MFA from Rhode Island School of Art and Design in 1995.

Sikander explores the integration of Hindu and Muslim culture by combining allegories from both societies and exploring imagery that communicates the hybridity of her experiences including, her personal history, politics and sexuality. Religion is a significant element in her art as well as her personal life, as an artist and practicing Muslim. Sikander explores in particular, the role of Muslim women and challenges the view Westerners have of associating Islam only with terrorism and the oppression of women.

Sikander has held solo exhibitions throughout the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, Ireland, Australia and Hong Kong. She has had solo exhibitions at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden and at the Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago.

Shahzia Sikander

Shahzia Sikander

Shahzia Sikander was born in 1969 in Lahore, Pakistan. She is a Pakistani-American artist who works in drawing, painting, animation, large-scale installation, performance and video. Sikander was traditionally taught the discipline of Indo-Persian miniature painting, where she studied at The National College of Lahore in Pakistan. Sikander received her MFA from Rhode Island School of Art and Design in 1995.

Sikander explores the integration of Hindu and Muslim culture by combining allegories from both societies and exploring imagery that communicates the hybridity of her experiences including, her personal history, politics and sexuality. Religion is a significant element in her art as well as her personal life, as an artist and practicing Muslim. Sikander explores in particular, the role of Muslim women and challenges the view Westerners have of associating Islam only with terrorism and the oppression of women.

Sikander has held solo exhibitions throughout the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, Ireland, Australia and Hong Kong. She has had solo exhibitions at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden and at the Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago.

Jean Shin

Jean Shin

Born in Seoul, South Korea and raised in the United States, Shin attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 1999 and received a BFA and MS from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn. She lives and works in New York City.

Jean Shin is nationally recognized for her monumental installations that transform everyday objects into elegant expressions of identity and community. For each project, she amasses vast collections of a particular object—prescription pill bottles, sports trophies, sweaters—which are often sourced through donations from individuals in a participating community. These intimate objects then become the materials for her conceptually rich sculptures, videos and site-specific installations. Distinguished by her meticulous, labor-intensive process, and her engagement of community, Shin's arresting installations reflect individuals' personal lives as well as collective issues that we face as a society.

Her work has been widely exhibited in major national and international museums, including in solo exhibitions at the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art in Arizona (2010), Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC (2009), the Fabric Workshop and Museum in Philadelphia (2006), and Projects at The Museum of Modern Art in New York (2004).

Ouattara Watts

Ouattara Watts

Ouattara Watts is a U.S. based artist born in Abidjan, Ivory Coast. Driven by a profound passion for visual culture, Watts devoted his formative years to deepening his artistic knowledge. This dedication would lead him to Paris, France, where he began his formal studies at l'École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts. Upon graduating he continued to develop the character of his work, soon attracting the attention of artists and collectors across the Atlantic including Jean-Michel Basquiat, who encouraged him to move to New York in 1988.

Now entering the fifth decade of his career, Watts has brought African spirituality, philosophy, and a depth of cultural insight together within an extensive body of work that attends to the artist’s interiority while aspiring towards the universal. His monumental paintings, drawings, and mixed media abstractions emerge from a transatlantic convergence of enigmatic ideograms. Broad painterly gestures cut through and embrace the anarchic landscapes at once, molding them into meditative spaces for invention. Each unfolds into a dynamic and ever-shifting universe of its own.

Ouattara Watts lives and works in New York and has participated in numerous exhibitions including Body of evidence at the National Museum of African Art, The Short Century: Independence and Liberation Movements in Africa, 1945-1994 at MoMa PS1, and Afriques Capitales at La Villette in Paris. His work has been displayed internationally at events such as the Venice Biennial (1993), Documenta 11 in Kassel (2002), the 1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair in London (2014), and the Dakar Biennial (2017). In 2018, he held his first personal exhibition in his native country, Before Looking at This Work, Listen to It, with Galerie Cécile Fakhoury.

Fred Wilson

Fred Wilson

Fred Wilson (born 1954, the Bronx) has created site-specific installations in collaboration with museums and cultural institutions throughout North America, the Caribbean, Europe, the Middle East, and Asia. His work encourages viewers to reconsider social and historical narratives and raises critical questions about the politics of erasure and exclusion. Beginning with the groundbreaking and critically acclaimed exhibition Mining the Museum(1992-93) at the Maryland Historical Society, Fred Wilson has juxtaposed and re-contextualized existing objects to create new installations, which alter their traditional meanings or interpretations. In 2003, Wilson represented the United States at the 50th Venice Biennale with the solo exhibition Fred Wilson: Speak of Me as I Am. His many accolades include the prestigious John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation “Genius” Grant (1999), amongst others.

Wilson's unique artist approach is to examine, question, and deconstruct the traditional display of art and artifacts in museums. With the use of new wall labels, sounds, lighting, and non-traditional pairings of objects, he leads viewers to recognize that changes in context create changes in meaning. Wilson's juxtaposition of evocative objects forces the viewer to question the biases and limitations of cultural institutions and how they have shaped the interpretation of historical truth, artistic value, and the language of display.

Kehinde Wiley

Kehinde Wiley

Los Angeles native and New York-based visual artist Kehinde Wiley has firmly situated himself within art history's portrait painting tradition. As a contemporary descendent of a long line of portraitists--including Reynolds, Gainsborough, Titian, Ingres, and others-- Wiley engages the signs and visual rhetoric of the heroic, powerful, majestic, and sublime in his representation of urban black and brown men found throughout the world.

By applying the visual vocabulary and conventions of glorification, wealth, prestige, and history to subject matter drawn from the urban fabric, Wiley makes his subjects and their stylistic references juxtaposed inversions of each other, forcing ambiguity and provocative perplexity to pervade his imagery. Wiley's larger-than-life figures disturb and interrupt tropes of portrait painting, often blurring the boundaries between traditional and contemporary modes of representation and the critical portrayal of masculinity and physicality as it pertains to the view of black and brown young men.

Kehinde Wiley received his MFA from Yale University in 2001. Shortly after, he became an Artist-in-Residence at the Studio Museum in Harlem. Wiley’s work has been the subject of exhibitions worldwide and is in the permanent collections of numerous museums including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the Studio Museum in Harlem; the Denver Art Museum; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; The Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; the High Museum, Atlanta; the Columbus Museum of Art; the Phoenix Art Museum; the Milwaukee Art Museum; the Jewish Museum, New York; and the Brooklyn Museum, New York.

Hiba Schahbaz

Hiba Schahbaz

Hiba Schahbaz was born in Karachi, Pakistan and lives in Brooklyn, NY. She works primarily with paper, black tea, and water-based pigments. She depicts women’s bodies while referencing self-portraiture, creating a space for herself and other women to tell their stories and reclaim their histories. Since migrating to the United States, her practice has expanded from miniature painting to human-scale works on paper.

Schahbaz trained in miniature painting at the National College of Arts, Lahore and received an MFA in painting from Pratt Institute. Her solo shows include The Garden (Spring/Break Art Show, 2018), Hiba Schahbaz: Self-Portraits (Project for Empty Space, 2017), Hanged With Roses (Thierry Goldberg Gallery, 2015), and In Memory (Noire Gallery, 2012). 

Schahbaz has participated in numerous group exhibitions; including shows at NiU Museum of Art, The Untitled Space, and Center for Book Arts; and at art fairs such as Pulse Art Fair, Art.Fair Cologne, and Vienna Fair. Her work has been written about in Vice, Hyperallergic, The Huffington Post, Coveteur, Vogue, NY Magazine, Art Critical, and others.

Schahbaz has curated painting exhibitions in Pakistan and India. She was an artist-in-residence at Mass MoCA, The Wassaic Project, Vermont Studio Center, and the Alfred Z. Solomon Residency at the Tang Museum. She teaches miniature painting at the Art Students League in NY.

Martin Wilner

Martin Wilner

Martin Wilner (b. New York, USA, 1959) is a multidisciplinary artist and practicing psychiatrist who lives and works in New York City.  Wilner’s background in psychiatry and psychoanalysis informs his artist practice, as well as, the themes of his intricate prints and drawings, exploring personal and collective narratives inspired by his observations working with clients and of the world around him.

Wilner is currently represented by Hales Gallery and the Sperone Westwater Gallery. His select solo shows include The Freud Museum (London), Pierogi (New York), the Cartin Collection at Ars Libri (Boston) and Bravin Lee Programs (New York), and select group exhibitions include the Jewish Museum (New York), Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, New Museum Los Gatos, Yossi Milo Gallery, MEM Gallery (Osaka, Japan), Daniel Weinberg Gallery (Los Angeles), Adam Baumgold Gallery (New York) and the Morgan Library & Museum (New York). Wilner's work can be found in numerous private collections including The Jewish Museum (New York), Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Vassar Art Library (New York), Warner Brothers (USA), The Morgan Library and Museum, The Sackner Archive of Concrete and Visual Poetry, Deutsche Bank and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Wilner has lectured extensively on the role of applied psychoanalysis in his artistic practice.  In 2015 to 2016, he completed a residency at SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence.  He also teaches at Weill Cornell Medical College as Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry. 

Chuck Close

Chuck Close

Close was born in 1940 in Monroe, WA. He is renowned for his highly inventive techniques of painting the human face, and is best known for his large-scale, photo-based portrait paintings. In 1988, Close was paralyzed following a rare spinal artery collapse; he continues to paint using a brush-holding device strapped to his wrist and forearm. His practice extends beyond painting to encompass printmaking, photography, and, most recently, tapestries based on Polaroids. In 2000, Close was presented with the prestigious National Medal of Arts by President Clinton. Close is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, has served on the board of many arts organizations, and was recently appointed by President Obama to serve on The President's Committee on the Arts and the Humanities. Close joined Pace Gallery in 1977.

Iona Rozeal Brown

Iona Rozeal Brown

Brown was born in 1966, Washington, DC and currently live and works in New York City. She received her MFA from Yale University School of Art, New Haven, CT in 2002. Brown uses her large-scale acrylic paintings to wryly comment on the ductile and ever-changing essence of cultural identity, most often by creating visual mash-ups of two disparate but in fact subtly harmonious subcultures: the samurai and geishas depicted in traditional Japanese ukiyo-e printmaking and the contemporary world of hip-hop. Trained in the art of ukiyo-e herself, Brown pursues a transcultural aesthetic in both her imagery and her technique, mixing the racial, gender, and class issues in her subject matter with the deftness of a DJ.

The artist's paintings have been widely exhibited, and she has received numerous solo shows including A3, Black on Both Sides, Spellman College Museum of Fine Art (2004); All Falls Down, Cleveland's Museum of Contemporary Art (2010); and Introducing…The House of Brando, Salon 94 (2013). In 2011 she was commissioned to create a performance for the Performa biennial. Her work is held in many permanent collections including the Hirshhorn Museum, the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, the National Gallery of Art, and the North Carolina Museum of Art.

Lyle Ashton Harris

Lyle Ashton Harris

Born in New York City, Harris spent his formative years in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania. He currently lives and works in New York City and is an Associate Professor at New York University.  Lyle Ashton Harris has cultivated a diverse artistic practice ranging from photographic media, collage, installation and performance. His work explores intersections between the personal and the political, examining the impact of ethnicity, gender and desire on the contemporary social and cultural dynamic. His work has been exhibited internationally, including at the Whitney Museum of American Art, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and the 52nd Venice Biennale.

His work has been exhibited at the Guggenheim Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London, the Kunsthalle Basel, and the Centre d'Art Contemporain in Geneva. During 2000 and 2001, Harris was a fellow at the American Academy in Rome. He has received numerous awards for his photography and is currently represented by CRG Gallery in New York. Harris' photographs have also appeared in international magazines, including The New York Times Magazine, Newsweek and Vibe.

Max De Frost

Max De Frost

Daniella Dooling

Daniella Dooling

Throughout the pandemic Dooling has been documenting discarded face masks as a diaristic practice. During her daily walks in isolation, she found transformations in these vitally necessary and politically charged objects not just into mundane mementos but also sculptural forms. Dooling found in the causal, unintended gesture of their discard, complications of shape and literal signification. In these photo collages the imaged physical space around each mask, the ground where it lay, its context, has been hand cut out in an ongoing investigation of the mask’s form, use, and meaning.

Daniella Dooling’s work resists genre definition. Her recent projects are activated through sculpture, collage, archival practice, and installation. Solo exhibitions include The Esther Massry Gallery, Albany, N.Y.; Michael Steinberg Fine Arts, New York, N.Y.; Anna Kustera Gallery, New York, N.Y.; and Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center, Buffalo, N.Y. Her work has also been shown in numerous group exhibition venues, including Magenta Plains, NY, NY; Tweed Museum of Art, Duluth, MN; Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, New Paltz, NY; Seager Gray Gallery, Mill Valley, CA; Re Institute, Millerton, NY; PAN/Palazzo delle Arti Napoli, Italy; American Academy of Arts & Letters; Chelsea Art Museum; Kerry Schuss Gallery; and Exit Art, all in New York. Dooling received her BFA from the School of Visual Arts and MFA from Yale University. She has taught in the Studio Arts Program at Bard College since 2003.

Deborah Brown

Deborah Brown

Deborah Brown received her BA summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa from Yale University and an MFA from Indiana University. Brown has been a visiting artist and lecturer at Penn State University, Hunter College, Pace University, Columbia University, Maryland Institute College of Art, Yale University and Art Omi. The artist's work has been exhibited in the United States and Europe including Gavlak, Palm Beach, FL; Anna Zorina Gallery, New York; Burning in Water, New York; The Lodge, Los Angeles; Nancy Littlejohn Fine Art, Houston, TX; GEARY Contemporary, New York; Lesley Heller Gallery, New York; BravinLee programs, New York; Galleri Christoffer Egelund, Copenhagen, and Angell Gallery, Toronto. Brown's work has been reviewed in The New York Times, Artforum, Art in America, Artillery Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, Observer, ARTnews, Artnet, Juxtapoz Magazine, Galerie Magazine, Houston Chronicle, The Denver Post, Madame Figaro, Hyperallergic and ART-Das Kuntsmagazin. Brown's work is included in prestigious public collections, among them the Indianapolis Museum of Art, DeCordova Museum, Frederick R. Weisman Museum of Art, Malibu, Bass Museum of Art, Miami, Arkansas Arts Center, Little Rock, Orlando Museum of Art, Florida, The Columbia Museum of Art, South Carolina.

Jane Benson

Jane Benson

Jane Benson is a sculptor and installation artist whose work explores the transition and transformation of both physical materials and aesthetic identity. She was born in England and now lives and works in Brooklyn. She received her BFA from Edinburgh College of Art (1994) and her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (1997).

She had exhibited in national and international venues including PS1 MoMA; Sculpture Center; Socrates Sculpture Park; the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia; and the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh. Solo shows include The End of the Patriarchal System and Song for Sebald, both at LMAK Gallery, New York; The Splits, at Abrons Art Center, New York; The Mews, at Thierry Goldberg Projects, New York; Chronicles of Narcissism, at Black & White Gallery, New York and Underbush, at Roebling Hall, New York. She has been the recipient of numerous awards and residencies including the Pollack-Krasner, the Fulbright Scholarship, The Vaults: Swing Space Residency, and the New Views: World Financial Center Residency, both with the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council.

Yevgeniy Fiks

Yevgeniy Fiks

Yevgeniy Fiks was born in Moscow in 1972 and has been living and working in New York since 1994. Fiks has produced many projects on the subject of the Post-Soviet dialog in the West, among them: “Lenin for Your Library?” in which he mailed V.I. Lenin’s text "Imperialism: The Highest Stage of Capitalism” to one hundred global corporations as a donation for their corporate libraries; “Communist Party USA,” a series of portraits of current members of Communist Party USA, painted from life in the Party’s national headquarters in New York City; and “Communist Guide to New York City,” a series of photographs of buildings and public places in New York City that are connected to the history of the American Communist movement.

Fiks’ work has been shown internationally at venues such as the Moscow Museum of Modern Art and Marat Guelman Gallery in Moscow; Sala de Arte Público Siqueiros in Mexico City, and the Museu Colecção Berardo in Lisbon. His U.S. exhibitions include presentations at the International Print Center, the MoMA, and the Winkleman and Postmasters galleries in New York, as well as Mass MoCA, and the Philadelphia Museum of Modern Art. His work has been included in the Moscow Biennale of Contemporary Art (2011, 2009, 2007 and 2005), Biennale of Sydney (2008) and Thessaloniki Biennale of Contemporary Art (2007).

Carroll Dunham

Carroll Dunham

Born 1949 in New Haven, Connecticut. Lives in New York City. Working since the late 1970s, Dunham’s career reached critical renown in the 1980s, a period during which many artists returned to painting. He is known for his conceptual approach to painting and drawing and his interest in exploring the relationship between abstraction and figuration.

Dunham has been the subject of numerous one-person exhibitions, including a mid-career retrospective at the New Museum in New York and an exhibition of paintings and sculptures at Millesgården in Stockholm. His work has been included in several Whitney Biennials and in “Disparaties and Deformations: Our Grotesque,” SITE Santa Fe’s fifth biennial curated by Robert Storr. He has participated in exhibitions at major institutions such as the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, Paris; and the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid.

His work is included in a number of public collections, including, amongst others, the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago; Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art, Oslo; Brooklyn Museum, New York; Museum Ludwig, Cologne; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia; Tate Gallery, London; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; and Whitney Museum of Art, New York.

Lauren Comito

Lauren Comito

This body of work is inspired by the correlation between the world of advertising and memory, in particular Edward Bernays’ development of public relations. Employing Sigmund Freud’s writings on psychoanalysis, Bernays paved the way for the world of marketing and advertising through his use of focus groups, which investigated people’s emotional connections to products. Comito mines her own archive of personal digital photography of places she has lived, pairing different packaging containers that came from goods or consumables she associated with that place. Her work alternates between traditional art marking techniques and digital processes. These incorporate barcodes and QR codes that transport the viewer back into the digital realm.

Lauren Comito currently lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. She received her Masters of Fine Arts in Painting from Rhode Island School of Design. Recent exhibitions include a two- person exhibition at Projekt 722, as well as solo exhibitions at Slag Gallery, and This Friday or Next Friday in Brooklyn. The artist has presented in group exhibitions at SPRING/BREAK, Brooklyn; Index Art Center, Newark; and EFA Project Space, New York, among others.

Derrick Adams

Derrick Adams

Derrick Adams is a multidisciplinary New York–based artist with practices rooted in Deconstructivist philosophies and the formation and perception of ideals attached to objects, colors, textures, symbols and ideologies. Focus is on fragmentation and manipulation of structure and surface – exploring shape-shifting forces of popular culture and its counter balances in our lives. The collage works on paper create minimal geometric constructions of angular human figures that seemingly live both in a state of deconstruction at the same time as if in the process of being built.

Adams received his MFA from Columbia University, his BFA from Pratt Institute, and is a Skowhegan and Marie Walsh Sharpe alumnus. Adams is a recipient of a Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Residency (2019), a Gordon Parks Foundation Fellowship (2018), a Studio Museum Joyce Alexander Wein Artist Prize (2016), and a Louis Comfort Tiffany Award (2009).

Notable solo exhibitions include: Where I’m From — Derrick Adams (2019) at The Gallery in Baltimore City Hall; Derrick Adams: Sanctuary (2018) at the Museum of Arts and Design, New York; and Derrick Adams: Transmission (2018) at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver. Public exhibition and performance highlights include: Men of Change: Power. Triumph. Truth. (2019) at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, Cincinnati; PERFORMA (2015, 2013, and 2005); The Shadows Took Shape (2014) and Radical Presence (2013–14) at The Studio Museum in Harlem; The Channel (2012) at the Brooklyn Academy of Music; Greater New York (2005) at MoMA PS1; and Open House: Working In Brooklyn (2004) at the Brooklyn Museum.

Derrick Adams

Derrick Adams

Derrick Adams is a multidisciplinary New York–based artist with practices rooted in Deconstructivist philosophies and the formation and perception of ideals attached to objects, colors, textures, symbols and ideologies. Focus is on fragmentation and manipulation of structure and surface – exploring shape-shifting forces of popular culture and its counter balances in our lives. The collage works on paper create minimal geometric constructions of angular human figures that seemingly live both in a state of deconstruction at the same time as if in the process of being built.

Adams received his MFA from Columbia University, his BFA from Pratt Institute, and is a Skowhegan and Marie Walsh Sharpe alumnus. Adams is a recipient of a Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Residency (2019), a Gordon Parks Foundation Fellowship (2018), a Studio Museum Joyce Alexander Wein Artist Prize (2016), and a Louis Comfort Tiffany Award (2009).

Notable solo exhibitions include: Where I’m From — Derrick Adams (2019) at The Gallery in Baltimore City Hall; Derrick Adams: Sanctuary (2018) at the Museum of Arts and Design, New York; and Derrick Adams: Transmission (2018) at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver. Public exhibition and performance highlights include: Men of Change: Power. Triumph. Truth. (2019) at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, Cincinnati; PERFORMA (2015, 2013, and 2005); The Shadows Took Shape (2014) and Radical Presence (2013–14) at The Studio Museum in Harlem; The Channel (2012) at the Brooklyn Academy of Music; Greater New York (2005) at MoMA PS1; and Open House: Working In Brooklyn (2004) at the Brooklyn Museum.